Magnificent Mont St Michel

Friday 7th August

This morning we were awakened to the unaccustomed sound of sheep being herded by a lone sheepdog without shepherd through the narrow street below our room at Mont St Michaels. After spending many weeks in some of the world’s largest and most popular cities we felt deliciously rural breathing sea air and even sheep dung air which some  of our colleagues on trip advisor were critical of our hotel for.  We soaked it up, slept in and were amongst the last to get down for breakfast.

Getting on to the island however returned us to Tourist Central with amazing crowds gathering in the carpark to walk to crowded shuttle buses which take off every 3 minutes. For a minute or two we thought we were back in Rome as it was a pleasantly warm day but quite hot in a crowd. Crossing the causeway, no matter how often seen on travelogues is still an interesting experience reminding us in particular of the Holy Island monastery at Carnarvon in northern England only here the towering fortress monastery build over a complex protruding and uneven rock face makes its somewhat menacing presence felt more and more as you approach.

Off the shuttle bus and on the causeway, Monastery looming

Off the shuttle bus and on the causeway, Monastery looming

It was interesting that the vast majority of the tourists were French so it is clearly a much loved family summer adventure and they came in their thousands with, of course, their dogs in every shape and size even though theoretically their dogs were not wanted in the monastery.  Not sure how that worked. (tag team i suspect). Once into the base of the monastery visitors are assaulted with a bewildering mass of souvenir stores and restaurants.  Sort of San Gimiano in Tuscany on steroids but without the high end wonderful shopping in San Gimmies. We wound our way ever upwards resisting the tempting sideways offerings of historical knights of old in various sections of the monastery and eventually joined a 30 minute queue to enter the actual working monastery. (Richard has now experienced four queues in his life!).

Tourist crowds climbing towards the top

Tourist crowds climbing towards the top

The many stairs are worth the effort as the official “tour” takes you on a well organised path first directly to the top level with panoramic views over the low-tide tidal river and very quickly to romantic and dazzling views of the English Channel and the Atlantic reaching far into the misty distance from the immense height of the structure. it was an interesting experience to have started in Istanbul on the Bosporos, almost the sounthern most part of Europe and to have wended our way to the northern coastline (obviously not counting Britain or Scandinavia,) and the variety of languages, customs and cultures we experienced to get there.

View of causeway from the top ...the tide running out was quite strong and folk who tried to walk across the

View of causeway from the top …the tide running out was quite strong and folk who tried to walk across the “beach” had very sticky muddy feet.

View straight down from the top..Richard with vertigo

View straight down from the top..Richard with vertigo

View north towards English Channel and the Atlantic..vast and beautiful in late morning sun

View north towards English Channel and the Atlantic..vast and beautiful in late morning sun

Another view of the causeway from the top

Another view of the causeway from the top

View of steeple from the top visitor level

View of steeple from the top visitor level

In Kraal castle style there are scary models here and there including this giant eagle and also dragon claws elsewhere

In Kraal castle style there are scary models here and there including this giant eagle and also dragon claws elsewhere

I was not prepared for the very high Gothic chapel on top of the mountain and we there at midday Friday for a weekly sung service of deep beauty. It was like a transport to seriously heavenly heights although for me conflicted having recently read the history of these fortress monasteries being designed in particular to fight the “evils of the Protestant heresy”.  I know the world and the church has moved on but it has saddened me throughout Europe to see the remnants of Eastern vs Western Christianity, Protestant vs Catholic, all vs Islam, state and city vs state and city. Humanity’s inability to get on with fellow humanity is heart breaking!

exceedingly high and beautiful Gothic chapel ..unexpected in the midst of such a heavily fortified monastery

exceedingly high and beautiful Gothic chapel ..unexpected in the midst of such a heavily fortified monastery

We journeyed through the monastery from chapel to refectory hall (huge) to a beautiful cloister garden,

Beautiful cloister garden of peace high up above ground level

Beautiful cloister garden of peace high up above ground level

to a series of smaller simple chapels through to scary dungeons (during the French Revolution St Michael’s mont was a prison) and other large rooms and eventually down a steep back stairway back to civilization to the outside beautiful gardens.  In all a (literally) breath-taking experience. From Mont St Michel we journeyed south leaving behind the fertile fields of Bretagne and Normandy and avoiding Paris we drove through many beautiful French villages with houses and shops right on the road as in many English villages. Further south the fields are gofden with cut grass neatly machine rolled into stacks as we passed Laval and Le Mans and drove into the Loire Valley and our home for the next four nights, the ancient city of Blois.

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